Why You Can Go Bold And Colorful With Your Wedding Bouquet

Why You Can Go Bold And Colorful With Your Wedding Bouquet

Trends run in cycles. After a lot of delicate, demure white bridal bouquets made of lily of the valley, white roses, white peonies and baby’s breath, who wasn’t ready for a dash of color? Queen Victoria inaugurated the White Wedding in 1840 in England,

with her white wedding dress, and a headdress of white orange blossoms. Up until then brides wore any old color – often blue. Victoria’s dress was a sensation, and ever since then white defined virginity, innocence and the “necessary” color for a bride’s dress and, it followed, for her bouquet. After that it’s been white, white, white, white, white.

No longer. Some modern brides wear red, peach, even black. “You are seeing today’s brides embrace a confident self-expression and a refined, differentiated aesthetic when designing bouquets,” says Marna Ringel, a florist in Fairfield, Connecticut, who had a bride five years ago who wore chocolate brown and turquoise, and wanted an equally unusual bouquet.

The white wedding gowns we do see are hardly traditional. They come strapless, backless, hiked up, arrayed with the kinds of features that would have made Victorians faint. Why should bridal bouquets be boring? Why not carry a bouquet of stunning and vivid ranunculus or their cousins the anemone?

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